Plum chutney is a sweet-and-tangy spread that is perfect for roasted meats, on sandwiches or as a dipping sauce. I made it last year with a box of Italian plums I picked with my friend Brigitte from a local farm. It has to be hands down one of the best chutney combinations I’ve ever had.

Italian plums from a local u-pick farm

Italian plums from a local u-pick farm

Any old plum will work for this recipe, but I happen to favor Italian plums. I love them so much that I planted one this past year on our homestead. They are great for fresh eating, preserving and drying – making them a good, easy to grow and easy to use fruit for the NW.

Grab a friend for the chopping - 3 lbs of plums gets a little boring!

Grab a friend for the chopping – 3 lbs of plums gets a little boring!

This chutney recipe is modified from the book Well Preserved, an excellent and creative food preservation cookbook that focuses on small batches. As is the case with most canning recipes, this one involves lots and lots of chopping. I don’t own a big food processor and I wanted the fruit pieces to stay chunky. So grab a friend and have them help you cut everything up.

Dried coriander seeds from the garden's bolted cilantro

Dried coriander seeds from the garden’s bolted cilantro

I used coriander seeds from some cilantro that had bolted earlier in the season. Just pull the plant and hang it to dry. You can replant those seed heads when the weather cools down or crush them in a mortar and pestle like I did to cook with.

Plum chutney ingredients

Plum chutney ingredients

Plum Chutney with Cinnamon & Coriander

  • 3 lbs. firm plums, roughly chopped
  • 1 c. Honeycrisp apple, chopped
  • 1 c. white onion, chopped
  • 2 c. brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 c. red wine vinegar
  • 1/2 c. golden raisins
  • 1 T. mustard seed
  • 3 tsp. dried chili flake (add more or less to suit your taste)
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 2 tsp. coriander seed, crushed
  1. Combine all ingredients into one big stock pot. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally.
  2. Once hot, lower heat to medium and stir often to prevent sticking. Simmer for about 45 minutes, or until the mixture is thick enough to stay mounded on a spoon. (You should be drinking wine or a cold beer with a friend during this part.)
  3. Get your canner filled with water and start bringing to a boil about halfway through the chutney cooking time.
  4. Ladle hot mixture into clean, sterilized canning jars leaving about 1/2″ of head space. Wipe the rims clean and adjust the two piece caps. Process the filled jars in a hot water bath for about 10 minutes.

Thickened chutney is ready for the canner when it mounds well on a spoon

Thickened chutney is ready for the canner when it mounds well on a spoon

That’s it! Pretty simple and straight forward. Again, adjust the seasoning to suit your taste. This recipe has enough acidity from the vinegar that you can feel comfortable increasing or decreasing the spices a bit.

Pint jars for us and half pints for gifts

Pint jars for us and half pints for gifts

I canned mine in both pint and half pint jars. We can easily devour a pint of chutney within a couple weeks after opening, while the smaller sized jars are good for gift-giving. Encourage gift receivers to use it as they would cranberry sauce. Enjoy!

 

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